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Common Myna 3360 by DPasschier
Common Myna 3360

The common myna (Acridotheres tristis), sometimes spelled mynah, also sometimes known as "Indian myna",[2] is a member of the family Sturnidae (starlings and mynas) native to Asia. An omnivorous open woodland bird with a strong territorial instinct, the myna has adapted extremely well to urban environments.

The range of the common myna is increasing at such a rapid rate that in 2000 the IUCN Species Survival Commission declared it one of the world's most invasive species and one of only three birds in the top 100 species that pose an impact to biodiversity, agriculture and human interests.[3] In particular, the species poses a serious threat to the ecosystems of Australia where it was named "The Most Important Pest/Problem".[4]


© DPasschier. All rights reserved. My images may not be reproduced or used in any form without my permission.

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Bakkar 3080 by DPasschier
Bakkar 3080
I was lucky to meet Bakkar a few weeks before he passed away and would like to share one of the photos I took that day.

The 21-year-old tiger (Bakkar) was put down on Saturday due to ailing health.

"As an elderly tiger he had begun to show a decline in his appearance in recent times and every possible measure was taken to maintain his health, comfort and well-being," the zoo said.

"He remained mobile and alert right up to his last day but the decision was made to humanely euthanise him after his health declined rapidly overnight."

"It's a sad time at the zoo. Unfortunately I think when working with animals we all know when the time's right  and the time unfortunately was right," she said.

Bakkar was born on December 30, 1994.

He lived at Dreamworld and the Western Plains Zoo in Dubbo for some time before spending his last 11 years at the National Zoo and Aquarium.

Ms Osterloh said Bakkar was well-known for his "chuff".

"Bakkar was renowned for his vocals and chuffing which is saying hello in tiger talk and that was really quite special," she said.

"You didn't have to be around him for long to actually build  up a really good connection and relationship and bond with him."

The zoo said Bakkar enjoyed the company of people.

"He'd spend most of the days (even when it was cold) over near the viewing window where he could watch the general public, but as soon as people went into the bungalow he'd move there for the night," the zoo said.

"Although he had access to his den as well, he'd usually stay where the people were and many Jamala guests have described how lucky they feel to have had that close connection with him. He was a great ambassador for his species and helped make a significant contribution in raising awareness about the plight of tigers in the wild."

Bengal tigers can live up to 12 years in the wild and up to 20 years in captivity.

The zoo said Bakkar outlived his siblings by a long time.

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Pink Flamingo.8195 by DPasschier
Pink Flamingo.8195
Flamingos or flamingoes[1] /fləˈmɪŋɡz/ are a type of wading bird in the genus Phoenicopterus, the only genus in the family Phoenicopteridae. There are four flamingo species in the Americas and two species in the Old World.

Flamingos often stand on one leg, the other leg tucked beneath the body. The reason for this behaviour is not fully understood. Recent research indicates that standing on one leg may allow the birds to conserve more body heat, given that they spend a significant amount of time wading in cold water.[14] However, the behaviour also takes place in warm water. As well as standing in the water, flamingos may stamp their webbed feet in the mud to stir up food from the bottom.[citation needed]

Young flamingos hatch with greyish reddish plumage, but adults range from light pink to bright red due to aqueous bacteria and beta-Carotene obtained from their food supply. A well-fed, healthy flamingo is more vibrantly colored and thus a more desirable mate; a white or pale flamingo, however, is usually unhealthy or malnourished. Captive flamingos are a notable exception; many turn a pale pink as they are not fed carotene at levels comparable to the wild.

Flamingos filter-feed on brine shrimp and blue-green algae. Their beaks are specially adapted to separate mud and silt from the food they eat, and are uniquely used upside-down. The filtering of food items is assisted by hairy structures called lamellae which line the mandibles, and the large rough-surfaced tongue. The pink or reddish color of flamingos comes from carotenoids in their diet of animal and plant plankton. These carotenoids are broken down into pigments by liver enzymes.[15] The source of this varies by species, and affects the saturation of color. Flamingos whose sole diet is blue-green algae are darker in color compared to those who get it second hand (e.g. from animals that have digested blue-green algae).


© DPasschier. All rights reserved. My images may not be reproduced or used in any form without my permission.

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Koala 3349 by DPasschier
Koala 3349

The koala (Phascolarctos cinereus, or, inaccurately, koala bear[a]) is an arboreal herbivorous marsupial native to Australia. It is the only extant representative of the family Phascolarctidae and its closest living relatives are the wombats. The koala is found in coastal areas of the mainland's eastern and southern regions, inhabiting Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria, and South Australia. It is easily recognisable by its stout, tailless body and large head with round, fluffy ears and large, spoon-shaped nose. The koala has a body length of 60–85 cm (24–33 in) and weighs 4–15 kg (9–33 lb). Pelage colour ranges from silver grey to chocolate brown. Koalas from the northern populations are typically smaller and lighter in colour than their counterparts further south. These populations possibly are separate subspecies, but this is disputed.

Koalas typically inhabit open eucalypt woodlands, and the leaves of these trees make up most of their diet. Because this eucalypt diet has limited nutritional and caloric content, koalas are largely sedentary and sleep up to 20 hours a day. They are asocial animals, and bonding exists only between mothers and dependent offspring. Adult males communicate with loud bellows that intimidate rivals and attract mates. Males mark their presence with secretions from scent glands located on their chests. Being marsupials, koalas give birth to underdeveloped young that crawl into their mothers' pouches, where they stay for the first six to seven months of their lives. These young koalas, known as joeys, are fully weaned around a year old. Koalas have few natural predators and parasites, but are threatened by various pathogens, such as Chlamydiaceae bacteria and the koala retrovirus, as well as by bushfires and droughts

Koalas were hunted by indigenous Australians and depicted in myths and cave art for millennia. The first recorded encounter between a European and a koala was in 1798, and an image of the animal was published in 1810 by naturalist George Perry. Botanist Robert Brown wrote the first detailed scientific description of the koala in 1814, although his work remained unpublished for 180 years. Popular artist John Gould illustrated and described the koala, introducing the species to the general British public. Further details about the animal's biology were revealed in the 19th century by several English scientists. Because of its distinctive appearance, the koala is recognised worldwide as a symbol of Australia. Koalas are listed as of Least Concern by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. The Australian government lists populations in Queensland and New South Wales as Vulnerable. The animal was hunted heavily in the early 20th century for its fur, and large-scale cullings in Queensland resulted in a public outcry that initiated a movement to protect the species. Sanctuaries were established, and translocation efforts moved to new regions koalas whose habitat had become fragmented or reduced. The biggest threat to their existence is habitat destruction caused by agriculture and urbanisation.


© DPasschier. All rights reserved. My images may not be reproduced or used in any form without my permission.

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Rainbow Lorikeet 2478 by DPasschier
Rainbow Lorikeet 2478

The rainbow lorikeet is a medium-sized parrot, with the length ranging from 25 to 30 cm (9.8–11.8 in), including the tail. The weight varies from 75 to 157 g (2.6–5.5 oz). The plumage of the nominate race, as with all subspecies, is very bright. The head is deep blue with a greenish-yellow nuchal collar, and the rest of the upper parts (wings, back and tail) are deep green. The chest is red with blue-black barring. The belly is deep green, and the thighs and rump are yellow with deep green barring. In flight a yellow wing-bar contrasts clearly with the red underwing coverts.

There is little to visually distinguish between the sexes; however, to a keen observer of their colouring and behaviour, their dimorphism is readily apparent.

Juveniles have a black beak, which gradually brightens to orange in the adults.

The markings of the best known subspecies T. h. moluccanus resemble those of the nominate race, but with a blue belly and a more orange breast with little or no blue-black barring.[8] Other subspecies largely resemble either the nominate race or T. h. moluccanus, or are intermediate between them. Two exceptions are T. h. flavicans and T. h. rosenbergii. In the rather variable T. h. flavicans the green of some individuals is dull, almost olivaceous,[8] but in others the green hue approaches that typical of the rainbow lorikeet. T. h. rosenbergii is highly distinctive and several features separates it from all other subspecies: Its wing-bars are deep orange (not contrasting clearly with the red underwing coverts in flight), the entire nape is yellow bordered by a narrow red band and the dark blue barring to the red chest is very broad.[


© DPasschier. All rights reserved. My images may not be reproduced or used in any form without my permission.

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Features

Journal Entry: Fri Mar 14, 2008, 11:04 PM
My Own Favorites


               Blue Horizon by DPasschier Point Of View by DPasschier Cold Steel by DPasschier
               Crossing by DPasschier Parked by DPasschier Mudcake 2 by DPasschier
               Shearing Shed by DPasschier 8:00.pm by DPasschier I See Red by DPasschier Event Horizon by DPasschier
                   Tess by DPasschierCorner Stone by DPasschierBalance by DPasschierWatch Your Step by DPasschier              
                Woman by DPasschier The Early Bird Gets... by DPasschier Woman 3 by DPasschier
                 Bloodsports 2 by DPasschier Strattons Hotel by DPasschier Bloodsports 1 by DPasschier

               Blue Wren by DPasschier





:icontbopi: :

                Agent Smith by Tbopi What is zis? by Tbopi Arcanine by Tbopi
                Donald Duck in MS Paint by Tbopi Large Body Heartless by Tbopi Donald Duck in MS Paint 4 by Tbopi





:icontpbug:


Sleepy heads by TPBug Cooper by TPBug Its a pony by TPBug                         
  Bloom by TPBug

                               

:iconelfedward:


Sid Napping by Elfedward Goose by Elfedward
Evil Queen 8 v.2 by Elfedward Soft Petals by Elfedward Tile Roof by Elfedward
  








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Clubs

:iconclubphoto: :iconflower-lovers:


:iconwonderful-world:





Mates
:icontbopi: :iconlyranthe: :iconben5069: :icontpbug:



Stamps
Gimme Coffee by Sadiya ::Insomniac Stamp:: by Sora05 Addicted To Music - Stamp by JWiesner Nikon by Krolikus Dpasschier Stamp by rhin-sowilo Electronic Dance Music stamp by TheBourgyman Stamp.01 by SydneySyders I Love The Rain by WearwolfaaArt Is My Life stamp by Birthstone
  • Listening to: Trance
  • Drinking: Coffee

Comments


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:iconstoriel:
Storiel Featured By Owner Jun 18, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Aww amazing photos!
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:icondpasschier:
DPasschier Featured By Owner Jun 18, 2016
Thank you :)
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:iconemcorpus:
emcorpus Featured By Owner Jun 14, 2016  Professional General Artist
Good morning, Dick. Greetings to you from California, where I'm many hours behind you. Thank you for dropping by and viewing my work, and for the llama. Thank you especially for sharing your own fine photographic art -- and what is obviously a considerable knowledge of nature subjects.
Cheers,
Ed
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:icondpasschier:
DPasschier Featured By Owner Jun 16, 2016
You are welcome.
Reply
:iconfabulaphoto:
FabulaPhoto Featured By Owner Jun 2, 2016  Hobbyist Photographer
THIS GALLERY IS FOR THE BIRDS   ;)

Knee slapper.

Seriously though, nice photos.
Reply
:icondpasschier:
DPasschier Featured By Owner Jun 3, 2016
Thank you very much. :)
While I was taking the photos of the Grey Crowned Crane it was eating so I didn't make a sound.
Reply
:icongemmsta:
Gemmsta Featured By Owner May 13, 2016  New Deviant
thanks for the llama! you have a beautiful gallery:)
Reply
:icondpasschier:
DPasschier Featured By Owner May 13, 2016
Thank you very much :)
Reply
:icongemmsta:
Gemmsta Featured By Owner May 13, 2016  New Deviant
you're welcome:)
Reply
:iconmoppiwolf:
moppiwolf Featured By Owner Mar 1, 2016  Professional General Artist
fav.me/d9tgksp
Your work is ready to view in my feature the Darkness and the light ☺
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